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11: Correlation

  • Page ID
    25688
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    • 11.1.1: Correlation Concepts Part 1
      A scatter plot shows the direction of a relationship between the variables. A clear direction happens when there is either: High values of one variable occurring with high values of the other variable or low values of one variable occurring with low values of the other variable. High values of one variable occurring with low values of the other variable.
    • 11.1.2: Correlation Concepts Part 2
      A regression line, or a line of best fit, can be drawn on a scatter plot and used to predict outcomes for the x and y variables in a given data set or sample data. There are several ways to find a regression line, but usually the least-squares regression line is used because it creates a uniform line. Residuals measure the distance from the actual value of y and the estimated value of y . The Sum of Squared Errors, when set to its minimum, calculates the points on the line of best fit.
    • 11.2: Correlation Hypothesis Test
      The correlation coefficient tells us about the strength and direction of the linear relationship between x and y. However, the reliability of the linear model also depends on how many observed data points are in the sample. We need to look at both the value of the correlation coefficient r and the sample size n, and perform a hypothesis test of the "significance of the correlation coefficient" to decide whether the linear relationship in the sample data is strong enough to use to linear model.
    • 11.3: Normal Probability Plots
      The distributions you have seen up to this point have been assumed to be normally distributed, but how do you determine if it is normally distributed.


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