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3: Probability

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    25650
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    • 3.1: Basics of Probability
      In this module we learned the basic terminology of probability. The set of all possible outcomes of an experiment is called the sample space. Events are subsets of the sample space, and they are assigned a probability that is a number between zero and one, inclusive.
    • 3.2: The Addition Rules of Probability
      There are several tools you can use to help organize and sort data when calculating probabilities. Contingency tables help display data and are particularly useful when calculating probabilites that have multiple dependent variables. When events do not share outcomes, they are mutually exclusive.
    • 3.3: Multiplication Rule for Independent Events
      Two events A and B are independent if the knowledge that one occurred does not affect the chance the other occurs.
    • 3.4: General Multiplication Probability
      If two events are not independent, then they are dependent. In sampling with replacement, with selecting each member with the possibility of being chosen more than once, and the events are considered to be independent. In sampling without replacement, each member may be chosen only once, and the events are considered not to be independent.


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