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6: The Normal Distribution

In this chapter, you will study the normal distribution, the standard normal distribution, and applications associated with them. The normal distribution has two parameters (two numerical descriptive measures), the mean (μ) and the standard deviation (σ).

  • 6.0: Prelude to The Normal Distribution
    The normal, a continuous distribution, is the most important of all the distributions. It is widely used and even more widely abused. Its graph is bell-shaped. In this chapter, you will study the normal distribution, the standard normal distribution, and applications associated with them. The normal distribution has two parameters (two numerical descriptive measures), the mean (μ) and the standard deviation (σ).
  • 6.1: The Standard Normal Distribution
    A z-score is a standardized value. Its distribution is the standard normal, Z∼N(0,1). The mean of the z-scores is zero and the standard deviation is one. If y is the z-score for a value x from the normal distribution N(μ,σ) then z tells you how many standard deviations x is above (greater than) or below (less than) μ.
  • 6.2: Using the Normal Distribution
    The normal distribution, which is continuous, is the most important of all the probability distributions. Its graph is bell-shaped. This bell-shaped curve is used in almost all disciplines. Since it is a continuous distribution, the total area under the curve is one. The parameters of the normal are the mean μ and the standard deviation σ. A special normal distribution, called the standard normal distribution is the distribution of z-scores. Its mean is zero, and its standard deviation is one.
  • 6.3: Normal Distribution - Lap Times (Worksheet)
    A statistics Worksheet: The student will compare and contrast empirical data and a theoretical distribution to determine if Terry Vogel's lap times fit a continuous distribution.
  • 6.4: Normal Distribution - Pinkie Length (Worksheet)
    A statistics Worksheet: The student will compare empirical data and a theoretical distribution to determine if data from the experiment follow a continuous distribution.
  • 6.E: The Normal Distribution (Exercises)
    These are homework exercises to accompany the Textmap created for "Introductory Statistics" by OpenStax.

Contributors

  • Barbara Illowsky and Susan Dean (De Anza College) with many other contributing authors. Content produced by OpenStax College is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0 license. Download for free at http://cnx.org/contents/30189442-699...b91b9de@18.114.