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5.5: Exercises

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    20041
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    5.1: Introduction

    5.2: Continuous Probability Functions

    Which type of distribution does the graph illustrate?

    The horizontal axis ranges from 0 to 10. The distribution is modeled by a rectangle extending from x = 3 to x =8.

    Which type of distribution does the graph illustrate?

    This graph slopes downward. It begins at a point on the y-axis and approaches the x-axis at the right edge of the graph.

    Which type of distribution does the graph illustrate?

    This graph shows a bell-shaped graph. The symmetric graph reaches maximum height at x = 0 and slopes downward gradually to the x-axis on each side of the peak.

    What does the shaded area represent? P(___< x < ___)

    This graph shows a uniform distribution. The horizontal axis ranges from 0 to 10. The distribution is modeled by a rectangle extending from x = 1 to x = 8. A region from x = 2 to x = 5 is shaded inside the rectangle.

    What does the shaded area represent? P(___< x < ___)

    This graph shows an exponential distribution. The graph slopes downward. It begins at a point on the y-axis and approaches the x-axis at the right edge of the graph. The region under the graph from x = 6 to x = 7 is shaded.

    For a continuous probability distribution, 0 ≤ x ≤ 15. What is P(x > 15)?

    What is the area under f(x) if the function is a continuous probability density function?

    For a continuous probability distribution, 0 ≤ x ≤ 10. What is P(x = 7)?

    A continuous probability function is restricted to the portion between x = 0 and 7. What is P(x = 10)?

    f(x) for a continuous probability function is 15

    , and the function is restricted to 0 ≤ x ≤ 5. What is P(x < 0)?

    f(x), a continuous probability function, is equal to 112

    , and the function is restricted to 0 ≤ x ≤ 12. What is P (0 < x < 12)?

    one

    Find the probability that x falls in the shaded area.

    CNX_Stats_C05_M02_item001.jpgThis shows the graph of the function f(x) = 1 9, the pdf for a uniform distribution. A horizontal line ranges from the point (0, 1/9) to the point (9, 1/9). A vertical line extends from the x-axis to the graph at x = 9 creating a rectangle with the coordinate axes on two sides. A region is shaded inside the rectangle from x = 6 to x = 8.

    Find the probability that x falls in the shaded area.

    902063719447ede776b3c000cae81c74ed9c2ff5.jpg

    Find the probability that x falls in the shaded area.

    CNX_Stats_C05_M02_item003.jpgThis shows the graph of the function f(x) = 1/10, the pdf for a uniform distribution. A horizontal line ranges from the point (0, 1/10) to the point (10, 1/10). A vertical line extends from the x-axis to the graph at x = 10 creating a rectangle with the coordinate axes on two sides. A region is shaded inside the rectangle from x = 2.5 to x = 5.5.

    f(x), a continuous probability function, is equal to 13

    and the function is restricted to 1 ≤ x ≤ 4. Describe P(x>32).

    The probability is equal to the area from x = 32to x = 4 above the x-axis and up to f(x) = 13

    Homework

    For each probability and percentile problem, draw the picture.

    Consider the following experiment. You are one of 100 people enlisted to take part in a study to determine the percent of nurses in America with an R.N. (registered nurse) degree. You ask nurses if they have an R.N. degree. The nurses answer “yes” or “no.” You then calculate the percentage of nurses with an R.N. degree. You give that percentage to your supervisor.

    1. What part of the experiment will yield discrete data?
    2. What part of the experiment will yield continuous data?

    When age is rounded to the nearest year, do the data stay continuous, or do they become discrete? Why?

    Age is a measurement, regardless of the accuracy used.

    5.3: The Uniform Distribution

    5.4: The Exponential Distribution

    5.5: Continuous Distribution


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