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Statistics LibreTexts

4: Discrete Random Variables

  • Page ID
    693
    • 4.0: Prelude to Discrete Random Variables
      Random Variable (RV) a characteristic of interest in a population being studied
    • 4.1: Probability Distribution Function (PDF) for a Discrete Random Variable
      A discrete probability distribution function has two characteristics: Each probability is between zero and one, inclusive. The sum of the probabilities is one.
    • 4.2: Mean or Expected Value and Standard Deviation
      The expected value is often referred to as the "long-term" average or mean. This means that over the long term of doing an experiment over and over, you would expect this average. This “long-term average” is known as the mean or expected value of the experiment and is denoted by the Greek letter μμ . In other words, after conducting many trials of an experiment, you would expect this average value.
    • 4.3: Binomial Distribution
      A statistical experiment can be classified as a binomial experiment if the following conditions are met: (1) There are a fixed number of trials. (2)There are only two possible outcomes: "success" or "failure" for each trial. (3) The trials are independent and are repeated using identical conditions. The outcomes of a binomial experiment fit a binomial probability distribution.
    • 4.4: Geometric Distribution
      There are three characteristics of a geometric experiment: (1) There are one or more Bernoulli trials with all failures except the last one, which is a success. (2) In theory, the number of trials could go on forever. There must be at least one trial. (3) The probability, p, of a success and the probability, q, of a failure are the same for each trial. In a geometric experiment, define the discrete random variable X as the number of independent trials until the first success.
    • 4.5: Hypergeometric Distribution
      A hypergeometric experiment is a statistical experiment with the following properties: You take samples from two groups. You are concerned with a group of interest, called the first group. You sample without replacement from the combined groups. Each pick is not independent, since sampling is without replacement. You are not dealing with Bernoulli Trials. The outcomes of a hypergeometric experiment fit a hypergeometric probability distribution.
    • 4.6: Poisson Distribution
      A Poisson probability distribution of a discrete random variable gives the probability of a number of events occurring in a fixed interval of time or space, if these events happen at a known average rate and independently of the time since the last event. The Poisson distribution may be used to approximate the binomial, if the probability of success is "small" (less than or equal to 0.05) and the number of trials is "large" (greater than or equal to 20).
    • 4.8: Discrete Distribution (Playing Card Experiment)
      A statistics Worksheet: The student will compare empirical data and a theoretical distribution to determine if an everyday experiment fits a discrete distribution. The student will demonstrate an understanding of long-term probabilities.
    • 4.9: Discrete Distribution (Lucky Dice Experiment)
      A statistics Worksheet: The student will compare empirical data and a theoretical distribution to determine if a Tet gambling game fits a discrete distribution. The student will demonstrate an understanding of long-term probabilities.
    • 4.E: Discrete Random Variables (Exercises)
      These are homework exercises to accompany the Textmap created for "Introductory Statistics" by OpenStax.

    Contributors

    • Barbara Illowsky and Susan Dean (De Anza College) with many other contributing authors. Content produced by OpenStax College is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0 license. Download for free at http://cnx.org/contents/30189442-699...b91b9de@18.114.